Numbness and tingling are the hallmarks of a nerve condition.  Damage or compression of nerves interferes with their normal function.  Over time, this can lead to chronic pain and muscle weakness.  There are many conditions that can cause numbness and tingling, including:

Sciatica

Sciatica is a relatively common condition resulting from pressure on or irritation of the five spinal nerve roots (which give rise to each sciatic nerve) and/or the sciatic nerves themselves.  Sciatic pain is usually felt in the lower back, buttock, or in parts of the leg and foot. In addition to the pain, which may be severe, sciatica can also cause numbness, muscular weakness, tingling and difficulty in moving or controlling the leg.

Pressure on the sciatic nerve may be the result of a herniated disk, muscle tension (such as that seen in Piriformis syndrome) or very rarely tumors or bony growths.  The paired sciatic nerves originate from opposite sides of the lower spine and run the entire length of each leg.  Each nerve controls muscles in the back of the thigh, knee and lower leg, as well as the sole of the foot. The location of the pressure on the sciatic nerve determines where the patient feels sciatic pain.

To treat sciatica, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique)

Trigger Point Dry Needling (depending on situation)

Chiropractic Manipulation/Mobilization

Corrective Exercise

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition characterized by tingling, numbness and pain in the hand and fingers (particularly the thumb, index, middle and ring fingers).  These symptoms are the result of pressure on the median nerve, which runs through a narrow passageway (called the carpal tunnel) from the wrist to the hand.  The median nerve provides sensation to the palm side of the hand and allows mobility of the thumb.  Inflammation in the wrist or forearm (pronator teres) can entrap the median nerve, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome.

To treat carpal tunnel syndrome, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique)

IASTM (Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization)

Chiropractic Manipulation/Mobilization

Workout
Lumbar Disc Syndrome

Lumbar Disc Syndrome is characterized by pain radiating from the low back (lumbar spine) to one or both legs. It may be caused by degenerative disc disease, a herniated disc or disc derangement.  Pain is often due to pressure on a nerve that runs from the low back to the buttock or thigh.

To treat lumbar disc syndrome, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique)

Neuro-Proprioceptive Taping

Chiropractic Manipulation/Mobilization

Corrective Exercise

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is a rare condition that occurs when nerves or blood vessels in the thoracic outlet are compressed.  The thoracic outlet is a small opening between the collarbone and upper ribs.  Nerves and blood vessels running from the spine to the arms travel through the thoracic outlet.  Compression of these nerves and blood vessels can lead to pain, numbness, tingling, poor blood circulation and weakness in the shoulders, neck, arms and hands.  This condition is usually related to injury or overuse of the shoulder joint, but anatomical differences in the thoracic outlet region (such as the presence of a cervical rib) cause some people to have a greater risk of developing TOS.

To treat thoracic outlet syndrome manual therapies may include:

ART (Active Release Technique) to release entrapped nerves and/or blood vessels

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Peripheral Nerve Entrapment

Peripheral Nerve Entrapment occurs when a peripheral nerve is compressed or irritated. Peripheral nerves transmit messages between the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the rest of the body. Symptoms of peripheral nerve entrapment include tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness and cramping. Each peripheral nerve has a specialized function in the body.  The location and severity of symptoms are related to the particular nerve(s) involved and the degree of entrapment.

To treat peripheral nerve entrapment, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique)

IASTM (Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization)

Corrective Exercise (specifically nerve flossing techniques)