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IT Band Syndrome (ITBS) is one of the leading causes of knee pain in runners.

The iliotibial band (IT band) runs along the length of the outer thigh, from the hip to the knee.   Friction between the IT band and the knee joint causes the area to become inflamed. Resting will decrease the pain and inflammation, but resuming activity usually causes it to recur. 

ITBS can be caused by many factors including muscle imbalances, hip weakness, myofascial adhesions (such as scar tissue), overtraining, or improper footwear.

 

Patellar Tendinopathy (PT)
Is There Swelling Around Your Knee? It Might Be PT

PT is a condition characterized by pain and inflammation in the section of the patellar tendon between your kneecap (patella) and the area where the tendon attaches to your shinbone (tibia). During physical activity, PT often causes a sharp pain directly below your kneecap — especially when running or jumping. After a workout or practice, this pain may persist as a dull ache.   

Overused or inflexible quadriceps muscles or a lack of mobility in the hip/ankle joint(s) may put you at a greater risk for developing PT.  These muscular imbalances can put abnormal stress on the patellar tendon leading to inflammation and pain.

To treat PT, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique) to break up scar tissue adhesions

IASTM (Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization

Trigger Point Dry Needling (depending on situation)

Chiropractic Manipulation/Mobilization

Corrective Exercise

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Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)
Is There Pain In The Front Of Your Knee?

PFPS refers to a group of conditions characterized by pain in the front of the knee caused by inflammation of the patellofemoral (PF) joint (located between the kneecap and femur).  PFPS may be caused by patellar compression or tilting, joint or muscular weakness and instability, biomechanical dysfunction, direct trauma to the region, overuse, or soft tissue lesions.

To treat patellofemoral pain syndrome, manual therapies may include one, or a combination of, the following:

ART (Active Release Technique) to break up scar tissue adhesions

IASTM (Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization

Trigger Point Dry Needling (depending on situation)

Chiropractic Manipulation/Mobilization

Corrective Exercise

Neuro-proprioceptive taping

Are You Ready To Be Free From The Pain In Your Knee?

In the absence of direct trauma, knee pain is usually a sign of an underlying problem elsewhere in the body.  Restricted mobility in the hip and/or ankle joint(s), muscle imbalances, and alignment issues can all put stress on the knee joint. Below are descriptions of the common knee conditions we treat.